Dr. Brandon Dahm

Dr. Brandon Dahm

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Co-Director of M.A. Philosophy Program

Graduate Status Faculty

Brandon Dahm is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville. He received his B.A. in philosophy from Iowa State University in 2005 and his M.A. in philosophy from Southern Evangelical Seminary in 2011. During his M.A., he took a year off to read St. Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theolgiae at the University of Cambridge. He then, finally, finished his degrees in 2016 with his PhD from Baylor University. Dr. Dahm wrote his dissertation under Thomas Hibbs on how we can have positive knowledge of a transcendent God. His other research is primarily on Aquinas’s moral philosophy, philosophy of religion, and the nature of virtue and vice.

Dr. Dahm is married to his wife, Andrea, a graphic designer and illustrator, and has two daughters, Beatrice and Esther, who don’t have jobs yet. In addition to doing philosophy, Dr. Dahm loves to cook, hang-out, and watch movies with his family and is an unrepentant coffee snob. In 2013, Brandon and Andrea became Catholic (the long version is told inEvangelical Exodus) and are very happy to be a part of Franciscan University.

  • Baylor University, Waco, TX, 2011-2016; Ph.D. Philosophy Dissertation: Knowing the Transcendent: Analogous Properties and Speaking About God Directed by Thomas Hibbs
  • Visiting Scholar, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, 2009-2010; Close reading of Aquinas’s Summa Theologiæ with Thomas D’Andrea
  • Southern Evangelical Seminary, Charlotte, NC, 2006-2011; M.A. Philosophy
  • Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2001-2005; B.A. Philosophy
null
Select Publications
  • “The Virtual Presence of the Acquired Virtues in the Christian,” Co-authored with W. Scott Cleveland, American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, Forthcoming
  • “The Acquired Virtues Are Real Virtues: A Response to Stump,” Faith & Philosophy, Vol. 32, No. 4, 453-470
  • ‘“The Certainty of Faith: A Problem for Christian Fallibilists?” Journal of Analytic Theology, Vol. 3, 130-146
  • “Distinguishing Desire and Parts of Happiness: A Response to Germain Grisez,” American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89:1, 97-114
  • “Friendship with the Holy Spirit,” Pentecost, Christian Reflection: A Series in Faith and Ethics (2015), 28-36 (Invited)